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      Healthcare enrollment moving along despite frequent glitches

      T his week the White House announced that has a 90% success rate for anyone trying to enroll.

      W e wanted to find out for ourselves if it has improved as much as the government say it has.

      O n October 1st, when was first launched, I visited the East Jordan Family Health Center to meet with an enrollment specialist.

      A t that time , the site was constantly crashing and it was impossible to sign up. I visited again 22 days later , to find out not much had changed .

      N ow more than two months after the site launched, I decided to go back.

      " I would say for the most part every application is mostly successful ," Laura Hill, enrollment specialist said.

      I sat down with Hill and began filling out my online application for enrollment.

      T he first steps were to set up an account with your personal information. N ext , they ask a series of questions to verify your identity.

      T his is where we hit a roadblock.

      " There are still a few glitches along the way , but they're not the kind of glitches that completely stop an application process ," Hill said.

      I t took us five minutes to resolve the glitch, then I was back to the enrollment process.

      F inally , I was able to look at the healthcare options and choose one. I t took me around 30 minutes to complete the entire process.

      " The glitches at this point are small it was very workable in your case," Hill said. "Basically it took us through the identity verification process again and since we had to leave the application and once we had to log back into the application had to go all the way through again."

      T he White House says the site is better and faster than it was when it was launched. The White House says the speed has tripled and they have fixed hundreds of bugs.

      B ut as you saw with my enrollment process , there are still a few kinks to work out.

      " There is frustration with some degree with people who are ready to enroll ," Hill said. "B ut I would say people have been very patient with me."