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      Mother of two soldiers tackles post-traumatic stress disorder

      Christine Stalsonburg learned techniques to help people with PTSD because she is in the process of starting a house to help those suffering from the disorder.

      Post-traumatic stress disorder affects nearly eight million Americans. While many of those people are veterans, it can affect anyone.

      Christine Stalsonburg learned techniques to help people with PTSD because she is in the process of starting a house to help those suffering from the disorder.

      ??I spent a week with my youngest son who??s having some issues now with his PTSD... I saw the way that he was treated; the hoops he had to go through when he went up to the VA's doors and said I need to talk to somebody now and he was turned away because they didn't have time to talk to him,?? said Stalsonburg.

      Stalsonburg wanted help for her son and she didn't want to wait until it was too late. That's what brought Nicole Johnson Starr to Northern Michigan. She leads seminars to educate people on ways to treat PTSD.

      ??With the VA taking months to get in to get treatment just to be assessed, I wanted to fill that gap,?? said Nicole Johnson Starr, organizer of the PTSD Retreat.

      Serving in the Army, Starr saw how the disorder affected her fellow soldiers.

      ??I saw some of the most amazing soldiers. Some of the most stellar; most respected. The best of the best falling apart due to PTSD.??

      The house Stalsonburg wants to open for those with PTSD won't just be for veterans. It will be open to anyone suffering from the disorder. Those involved with the design envision a serene atmosphere.

      ??Wholesome, comfortable environment with other people that have been through the same problems that you've been through,?? said Larry Lelito, Veterans Peer Counselor.

      The house will be dedicated to Ryan Patrick Kennedy, a close family friend of Stalsonburg who committed suicide. Kennedy and Stalsonburg's two sons in the military are her motivation behind this house.

      ??I knew that can't happen to another service member out there. To walk out those doors and not have another option that they can go to. He had no other option,?? said Stalsonburg.

      Stalsonburg is now in the process of designing the house and its programs.

      If you want more information on how you can help support Stalsonburg??s mission you can visit their website.