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      Survey says overweight, obese Americans do not see themselves that way

      More than half of adults say they do not think they are overweight and are not making an effort to lose weight, a new Gallup poll claims.

      While the obesity rate rises nationwide, Americans seem to be having a hard time admitting it.

      More than half of adults say they do not think they are overweight and are not making an effort to lose weight, a new Gallup poll claims.

      That is despite recent studies that show two-thirds of Americans are considered overweight or obese.

      When testing men and women separately, they found 60 percent of men say they are neither overweight or trying to lose weight compared to 50 percent of women who said the same thing.

      "These data highlight the importance of perception in the battle to fight obesity in the U.S.," Gallup officials said. "This discrepancy may suggest that addressing the obesity crisis in America must first start by convincing overweight Americans that they are indeed overweight."

      The poll says about 36 percent of those surveyed described themselves as overweight. Among those 36 percent, only 18 percent said they were trying to lose weight and another 18 percent said they were not.

      An estimated 160 million people, two-thirds of Americans, are overweight or obese, according to a study from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle.