MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

A look at the Village of Roscommon's water system

"It's a responsibility as an operator, take pride in what we do, want to provide the best product possible to the residents," Linderman said. "We've been able to do a good job of that. We have three wells that test terrific month after month. So, we're real happy with the water quality here and happy to past that on to the customers, or residents."

As part of our coverage on cities and villages water systems throughout northern Michigan, we take a look at how the Village of Roscommon's water system is run.

The Village of Roscommon's Department of Public Works staff conducts monthly water tests.

"On a regular basis, we are required to do bacteriological sampling," Linderman said. "Those samples are taken once a month. One from each of our wells and two distribution samples."

Linderman says it's a Michigan Department of Environmental Quality requirement to conduct those samples monthly. He says there are also monitoring requirments the DEQ gives out. Linderman says they haven't taken any additional steps since the Flint water crisis. Unrelated to the Flint water crisis, he tells us he's conducted 60 tests over the past six months. That's double what he normally does.

"In September, we sampled four lead and copper," Linderman said. "It was part of our monitoring requirement provided to us by the state, by the DEQ. So, the timing on that was real good, obviously. But, we did lead and copper sampling. We've recently done volatile organic compounds, complete metals, tritium testing. So, it's a pretty aggressive test schedule."

The Village of Roscommon's water system has a 250,000 gallon water storage facility, along with three wells in the village that are pumped throughout a distribution system. This service provides water into around 1,100 families' homes.

"It's a responsibility as an operator, take pride in what we do, want to provide the best product possible to the residents," Linderman said. "We've been able to do a good job of that. We have three wells that test terrific month after month. So, we're real happy with the water quality here and happy to past that on to the customers, or residents."

"It's very important to have clean water anywhere you go," Robert Mensinger, a Roscommon resident, said. "Any part of country, any part of the world, it's really important to have clean water."

Linderman also says around 60 to 70 percent of the pipes in the system are newer, as they were put in about 15 years ago, reaching only about a third of their life span.

Because of DEQ requirements, the Village of Roscommon is also currently chlorinating the water system. But, Linderman says it's in small amounts and still safe to drink.

The Village doesn't have a time table on how long its water system will be chlorinated for.

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending