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CMU researchers look to control Great Lakes invasive species

Researchers at Central Michigan Universities Biological Station on Beaver Island are working hard on their summer projects

Researchers at Central Michigan Universities Biological Station on Beaver Island are working hard on their summer projects.

One of their most important projects focuses on the problems being caused by several invasive species throughout the Great Lakes.

Since May, researchers have been conducting invasive species interaction experiments at the Beaver Island Bio Station.

The bio stations researchers and their program research students are looking for ways to protect the &7.5 billion dollar Great Lakes fishing industry.

â??They are changing the eco-system tremendously and if we just look at the impacts of Zebra and Quagga Mussels, their basically stripping the energy source from the water column and then depositing the nutrients on the bottom of the lakes,â?? said CMU Biological Station Director Don Uzarski.

Each Zebra and Quagga mussel filters a litre of water a day, taking vital plankton and algae away from trout and salmon.

Researchers are learning how to deal with invasive species using new mesocosm tanks.

Using the tanks, researchers can replicate the conditions of any freshwater ecosystem.

Out on the waters surrounding Beaver Island, CMUâ??s research students learn how to take different types of water samples for research and analysis.

â??The frequency of sampling really helps us to understand how dynamic these systems are so itâ??s really important,â?? said CMU Professor of Biology Deric Learman

About 200 Central Michigan University students come to study, do research and take classes at the Beaver Island Biological Station each summer.

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