69
      Saturday
      82 / 67
      Sunday
      85 / 70
      Monday
      79 / 60

      Great Lakes levels on the rise

      The Great Lakes are on the rise following a year of record breaking low-levels.

      The Great Lakes are on the rise following a year of record breaking low-levels.

      Lake Superior is reporting a 9-inch rise in levels for May, which is the second highest since 1918. The average rise for May is 4-inches.

      In a new report from the International Lake Superior Board of Control, experts said the jump in levels is due to snowmelt and above-average precipitation in the Superior basin during the past month.

      The level of Lake Superior is expected to rise during the month of June. Currently, the Lake Superior level is about 7-inches below its long-term average beginning-of-June level, and is 3-inches above the level recorded a year ago.

      The level of Lakes Michigan-Huron rose 5-inches this past month, while on average it rises 3-inches in May.

      The level of Lakes Michigan-Huron is now about 20-inches below its long-term average beginning-of-June level, and is 2-inches lower than it was a year ago. (7&4 Storm Team Meterologist explains the precipitation numbers here.)

      Experts say the level of Lakes Michigan-Huron is also expected to increase in June.

      In February the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reported Lake Michigan and Lake Huron hit the lowest water levels ever recorded on the Great Lakes.

      The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said tests taken in January show the lakes were 29 inches below their long-term average. The other Great Lakes, Superior, Erie and Ontario were also well below average.

      Low water causes economic concerns by forcing cargo ships to carry lighter loads, leaving boat docks high and dry, and also damage fish spawning areas.

      The International Lake Superior Board of Control is under authority of the International Joint Commission. The Board of Control continues to monitor the levels of the Great Lakes and the impact of outflow.