69
      Thursday
      84 / 63
      Friday
      84 / 65
      Saturday
      86 / 67

      Morris Dewitt Crash 10 years anniversary

      August 25th marks the ten year anniversary of a tragic car accident that claimed the lives of Adrian Morris and Christian Dewitt of Grand Traverse County.

      Timothy Schubert was behind the wheel of the car that hit the teens and was sentenced to serve two years in prison for negligent homicide.

      Penny Morris, the mother of Adrian, has spent the last decade fighting for better enforcement of traffic laws and stiffer penalties.

      Penny Morris was greeted Monday with bouquets and cards from those who remembered the day 10 years ago, that her daughter passed away.

      "She would never have wanted us to just wallow in sorrow, she would've said let's do something about this," says Penny Morris.

      That's exactly what Penny tried to do for some time, by changing the laws that she says protects irresponsible drivers.

      "We got so discouraged that we dropped it for a time," says Morris.

      But despite failures and frustrations, she battled on.

      "I've spoken to state representatives and everybody thinks it's a good idea but nobody really wants to be the person to do anything," says Morris.

      Morris says there is no reason the man who killed her daughter should have been driving. His record shows more than 49 traffic citations and 15 misdemeanor violations.

      "I don't think anybody can look at Mr. Schubert's driving history and understand why he would've been on the road that day to begin with a valid license," says Grand Traverse County Prosecutor Bob Cooney.

      Prosecutor Cooney says we may have taken a step backwards.

      "They've done away with the negligent homicide crime that Mr. Schubert was convicted of and today it would be moving violation causing death which is a one year misdemeanor," says Cooney.

      Morris is hoping legislators will develop mandatory sentencing guidelines so people like Schubert won't be able to get behind the wheel after these situations.

      "We don't need new laws, we just need the ability to really enforce the ones that we do have, all I'm asking for people that have the know how to step up and help us figure out how to do it, says Morris.