NCMC Petoskey installs small-scale waste-water treatment unit in residence hall


    A small-scale waste-water treatment unit has been installed in a residence hall on North Central Michigan College's Petoskey campus (Photo Courtesy: North Central Michigan College)

    EMMET COUNTY, Mich., (WPBN/WGTU) -- A northern Michigan college now has a small-scale waste-water treatment unit installed.

    North Central Michigan College, in partnership with SludgeHammer Group, Ltd. and the Little Traverse Bay Protection & Restoration Fund of the Petoskey-Harbor Springs Area Community Foundation, was able to install the unit in a residence hall on their Petoskey campus.

    The unit uses biological technology to treat wastewater onsite and will reduce North Central's impact on Petoskey's municipal wastewater treatment facility by "pre-cleaning" the sewage discharged from campus.

    A small-scale waste-water treatment unit has been installed in a residence hall on North Central Michigan College's Petoskey campus (Photo Courtesy: North Central Michigan College)

    In addition to the unit, three professors for the school will create water resource awareness and stewardship modules in at least three college science courses and a portable educational tool for use in K-12 schools.

    "This collaboration at North Central will allow our students to see first-hand how locally-developed science and technology can make our Great Lakes region a leader in water quality, sustainability and innovation. It also demonstrates the commitment our College has made to building an environmentally responsible campus that will inspire our area's citizens and protect our unique ecological heritage," states Ben Crockett, professor of Human Biology.

    According to Dr. Gutierrez, the wastewater treatment unit has already enhanced the microbiology experience for her students as they applied multiple principles learned throughout the semester to the design and workings for the unit during their installation tour.

    “The SludgeHammer wastewater treatment unit has the potential to be a game-changer in the industry,” states Dr. David Roland Finley, president of North Central. “The implementation of this demonstration project at North Central provides tremendous opportunity for students and is a great example of community partnerships in bringing this installation to reality. Students will benefit by seeing the very latest in cutting-edge technology in this field, and curricula can be developed related to this project that will provide access to in-demand jobs for the 21st century.”

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